Many voices, one sound – is your team hitting the right notes with its team-building initiatives?

Getting clarity on team-building initiatives

When I speak to a potential client for a team-building program, I ask for details to provide me with context about the environment and culture.  Do people generally get along?  Has there been an influx of new hires lately?  Are there any clashes between the “old guard” and the newer generations?

Many times, the potential client reaching out only knows they want to offer some type of “team-building,” but they’re not sure what messages that should or could include.  A few years back, I took a course with amazing facilitator Mary Tolena, owner of Rhythm Lift and a Remo-endorsed drum circle facilitator .  Her client intake form includes a great question:  what do you want your participants to think, feel and be ready to do by the end of the session?

This usually sparks some insightful comments from the potential client.  Often, someone offers that the team includes a lot of people from various backgrounds who simply have challenges getting along with each other.  Maybe there are too many cooks in the kitchen – some who are 62, and some who are 28.

At this point in the conversation, I’ll expand on how drumming programs help bring people together.  The simple act of everyone playing drums together encourages participants to listen to what each person contributes to the overall sound.  Read on for two other ways drumming can foster an inclusive environment.  Then ask yourself, how is your team doing with its team-building initiatives?

A symphony of sounds

In the drum circle, there are many types of drums – from large bass drums to small handheld drums and everything in between.  Also, we often include small percussion like egg shakers, Boomwhackers, bells, and wood blocks.  At some point during the jam session, I’ll usually stop the whole group and highlight one type of instrument, e.g., the shakers.  When the boom-y, bass-y sound of the drums drops out and all you hear are a bunch of little egg shakers, I usually see a few smiles in the group, like, “Wow!  I didn’t even know those guys were playing.”  We show appreciation for each group’s (and person’s) contribution to the rhythm, and in the process, we might hear new rhythms or ideas emerge.

A metaphor for diversity

Right, so “diversity” is a generic term that can encompass a lot of smaller and more specific items.  It usually goes hand-in-hand with “inclusion.”  What is your group really saying when it claims those two values?

Well, “diversity” can refer to race, ethnicity, religion, orientation, age, or a myriad of other categories.  “Inclusion” typically means that a group welcomes all people in these categories and values a variety of thoughts, beliefs, and opinions of its participants.

Now, under this umbrella is where the drum circle thrives.  In it, we accept everyone as they are and listen to and appreciate their ideas.  Participants can listen to other’s contributions in non-judgmental atmosphere and compare their own thoughts, actions, and decisions.

Now what?

How does your team or work environment approach diversity and inclusion?  What specific initiatives or policies does your organization have in place to ensure all voices are heard, valued, and respected?

And, could your workplace benefit from a tune-up?  Reach out to us today!

 

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